26 June 2017

On This Day, 26 June 1767

Location of Brabander on
Karte der deutschen Siedlungen im Wolgagebiet
(Map of German settlements in the Volga region, AHSGR map #6)
Brabander, a Catholic Mother colony, was founded in the Volga region of Russia on 26 June 1767 by LeRoy and Picet, a co-operative company commissioned by Catherine the Great to recruit and settle Germans in Russia.

On Google Maps, there are several photos of the old flour mill, which is located southwest of the village on the edge of the Volga.  Click on the photos on the left-hand side of the screen to view them.












Location of the Volga colony Brabander.  Today it's known as Krasnoarmeyskoye, Saratov, Russia.



Learn More: 
Center for Volga German Studies - Brabander
LeRoy and Pictet
Volga German Institute - Brabander
Wolgadeutsche (History of the Volga Germans) - Brabander



2017 marks the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Mother colonies along the Volga River. There are many events throughout the year to commemorate the anniversary, and the Germans from 
Russia Settlement Locations project joins in the celebration of this rich Volga German heritage.  

The German immigrants that came to the Volga region were among first colonists to take up Catherine the Great on her manifesto. They came from Hesse, the Rhineland, the Palatinate and Württemberg.  They are also among the most well researched and documented groups of German colonists in Russia. Thus far, the Volga Mother colonies settled between 1764 and 1767 are the only colonies that have precise dates they were settled.  

For more historical and current events related to Germans from Russia, see our calendar page or link to our public Google calendar.




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24 June 2017

On This Day, 24 June 1767...or maybe 1764...or possibly 1776...

Location of Semenovka on
Karte der deutschen /Siedlungen im Wolgagebiet
(Map of German settlements in the Volga region, AHSGR map #6)
Sources do not agree on the year Semenovka (Röthling) was founded.

Several of them indicate that Semenovka, a Catholic Mother colony, was founded on 24 June 1767.   Others state it was founded as early as 1764,  or as late as 1776.  One cites it as the first colony in the Kamenka district, settled around the same time as Galka, which was founded 12 August 1764.  But there is also a dispute on the year Galka was founded, too.   But most agree on the year 1764.  Other early colonies settled in the Kamenka district were Dobrinka (29 June 1764) and Volmer (18 July 1764...or possibly 1766).

In the 1767 population records, 43 households were recorded with a total of 144 colonists, 73 male and 68 female.  There was a cooperative store, an agriculture kolkhoz founded with loans, a school with grades 1 through 4, a reading room, and it was the soviet seat as of 1926.



Plat map of Semenovka, courtesy of AHSGR.  The creation date is unknown, but the agency which produced it,
Main Department of Geodesy and Cartography under the USSR Council of Ministers
(Главное управление геодезии и картографии при Совете министров СССР), existed between 1967 and 1991.


A partly cloudy day in the  Volga colony Semenovka,
which still goes by the same name today.  


Learn More: 
Center for Volga German Studies - Semenovka
Volga German Institute - Semenovka
Wolgadeutsche (History of the Volga Germans) - Semyonovka



2017 marks the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Mother colonies along the Volga River. There are many events throughout the year to commemorate the anniversary, and the Germans from 
Russia Settlement Locations project joins in the celebration of this rich Volga German heritage.  

The German immigrants that came to the Volga region were among first colonists to take up Catherine the Great on her manifesto. They came from Hesse, the Rhineland, the Palatinate and Württemberg.  They are also among the most well researched and documented groups of German colonists in Russia. Thus far, the Volga Mother colonies settled between 1764 and 1767 are the only colonies that have precise dates they were settled.  

For more historical and current events related to Germans from Russia, see our calendar page or link to our public Google calendar.



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20 June 2017

On This Day, 20 June 1767


Location of Remmler (Luzern) on
Karte der deutschen Siedlungen im Wolgagebiet
(Map of German settlements in the Volga region, AHSGR map #6)
The Volga colony of Remmler, also known as Luzern, was founded on 20 June 1767 as a Roman Catholic colony by Baron Ferdinand de Canneau de Beauregard, a settlement agent hired by Catherine the Great.

Some sources state that the colony may have been settled as early as 1764-66.  The first population count wasn't until 1769 when 44 households were enumerated with 140 colonists total, 76 male and 64 female.










Location of the Volga colony Remmer (Luzern). 
Today it is known as Mikhaylovka, Saratov, Russia.

































Learn More: 
Center for Volga German Studies - Luzern
Geschichte der Russlanddeutschen (History of Russian Germans) - Baron Canneau de Beauregard
Volga German Institute - Luzern
Wolgadeutsche (History of the Volga Germans) - Remmler



2017 marks the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Mother colonies along the Volga River. There are many events throughout the year to commemorate the anniversary, and the Germans from 
Russia Settlement Locations project joins in the celebration of this rich Volga German heritage.  

The German immigrants that came to the Volga region were among first colonists to take up Catherine the Great on her manifesto. They came from Hesse, the Rhineland, the Palatinate and Württemberg.  They are also among the most well researched and documented groups of German colonists in Russia. Thus far, the Volga Mother colonies settled between 1764 and 1767 are the only colonies that have precise dates they were settled.  

For more historical and current events related to Germans from Russia, see our calendar page or link to our public Google calendar.



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16 June 2017

On This Day, 16 June 1766

Among the first villages settled on the Wiesenseite (meadow side) of the Volga River was Mariental. The name translates to "Mary's Valley."  There were 20 German villages in Russia with the name Mariental listed in German-Russian Handbook: A Reference Book for Russian German and German Russian History and Culture, and this was the very first founded.

Most sources agree that Mariental, a Roman Catholic colony, was founded on this day, 16 June 1766. Others indicate that may have been settled earlier,  29 June 1764.


Plat map of Mariental as remembered from about 1941.
Map courtesy of American Historical Society of Germans from Russia.
A larger version is also available from Volga Germans Germans from Russia


Location of Mariental on
Karte der deutschen Siedlungen im Wolgagebiet
(
Map of German settlements in the Volga region, AHSGR map #6)


Location of the Volga colony Mariental.
Today it's known as Sovetskoye, Saratov, Russia.  



For more information, visit the following sites: 
Center for Volga German Studies - Mariental
Volga German Institute - Mariental
Volga Germans Germans from Russia - Mariental, Mariental plat map



2017 marks the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Mother colonies along the Volga River. There are many events throughout the year to commemorate the anniversary, and the Germans from 
Russia Settlement Locations project joins in the celebration of this rich Volga German heritage.  

The German immigrants that came to the Volga region were among first colonists to take up Catherine the Great on her manifesto. They came from Hesse, the Rhineland, the Palatinate and Württemberg.  They are also among the most well researched and documented groups of German colonists in Russia. Thus far, the Volga Mother colonies settled between 1764 and 1767 are the only colonies that have precise dates they were settled.  

For more historical and current events related to Germans from Russia, see our calendar page or link to our public Google calendar.



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15 June 2017

On This Day, 15 June 1765, 1766, 1767


1765

Shcherbakovka, also known as Deutsch Tscherbakowka and Mühlberg between 1917 and 1941, was founded as a Lutheran colony on 15 June 1765 by the Russian Government on the lower Volga River.  It was named in honor of Mikhail Shcherbatov, a noble, writer and promoter of Russian Enlightenment during the time of Catherine the Great.

Most of the immigrants were farmers, but by 1798, there were several craftsmen including a joiner, a blacksmith, a tailor, a cobbler and two weavers.


Location of the Volga colony Shcherbakovka (Mühlberg). Today it's still known as Shcherbatovka, Volgograd, Russia


1766

Louis was founded on 14 June 1766 by LeRoy and Picet, a co-operative company commissioned by Catherine the Great to recruit and settle Germans in Russia. as a Roman Catholic colony.  The colony had a cooperative store, an agriculture kolkhoz (cooperative) founded with loans and a school with grades 1 through 4.

Location of the Volga colony Louis, now known as Stepnoje, Saratov, Russia.


1767

Pfeifer, a Roman Catholic colony, was founded on the right bank of the Ilava River on 15 June 1767 by the Russian Government. The colony had a cooperative store, an agriculture kolkhoz (cooperative) founded with loans and a school with grades 1 through 4.


Location of the Volga colony Pfeifer, currently known as Gvardeyskoye, Saratov, Russia.



For more information about these villages, visit the following sites: 
Center for Volga German Studies - Louis, Pfeifer, Scherbakovka
LeRoy and Pictet
The Lower Volga Project - Shcherbakovka
Volga German Institute - Louis, Pfeifer, Scherbakovka
Volga Germans Germans from Russia - Louis, Pfeifer
Wolgadeutsche (History of the Volga Germans) - Louis, Pfeifer, Mühlberg (Scherbakovka)



2017 marks the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Mother colonies along the Volga River. There are many events throughout the year to commemorate the anniversary, and the Germans from 
Russia Settlement Locations project joins in the celebration of this rich Volga German heritage.  

The German immigrants that came to the Volga region were among first colonists to take up Catherine the Great on her manifesto. They came from Hesse, the Rhineland, the Palatinate and Württemberg.  They are also among the most well researched and documented groups of German colonists in Russia. Thus far, the Volga Mother colonies settled between 1764 and 1767 are the only colonies that have precise dates they were settled.  

For more historical and current events related to Germans from Russia, see our calendar page or link to our public Google calendar.






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14 June 2017

Map Refresh: Dobrudscha

The map of the Dobrudscha (Dobruja) colonies has been completely updated. There is a lot of new information, including some corrections and sources.  In time, more of the defunct villages will be added.

According Die Deutschen in der Dobrudscha (see sources below for the online English translation), the area of Dobruja, which is now in Romania and Bulgaria, was an area to which Germans migrated rather than immigrated.  In other words, they had already left Germany behind a generation or two prior.  They came from South Russia, from the areas of  Bessarabia, Kherson, Jekaterinoslav and Taurida (all along the Black Sea region), but also from Russian Poland, Volhynia, Galizien, Bukovina and Hungary.

The earliest migrants arrived on their own around 1841.  During this first period of migrations, there wasn't any recruitment, official manifesto, government invitation, or assistance with re-location. Migrants sometimes just wandered or stayed in places for short periods before ending up in Dobrudscha.  Akpunar and Jacobsonsthal were the first colonies to have German settlers.  Akpunar only existed for about six years before being abandoned, and the Jacobsonsthal was technically outside the borders of what was historically known as Dobrudscha, northwest of Brăila.    

The second wave of migrants came between 1873 and 1883.  Russian Tsar Alexander II had revoked the manifestos of Catherine the Great and Alexander I in 1871, and in doing so, revoked all the rights, freedoms and privileges promised to the colonists.  In 1873, the German colonists became subject for conscription into the Russian military, prompting them to immediately begin looking for opportunities in other countries.  Emissaries from Bessarabai showed up during this time looking for available land and taking the news back to the colonists who wanted to leave.

The third wave came in 1890, spurred by nationalism in Russia which included a law that forbade land ownership to anyone still holding a foreign passport and had not become a subject of the Russian Empire.  They could not even cultivate or sow in Russian soil if they were not citizens of Russia. This again prompted many German colonists to leave Russia, many going to North America but many again to Dobrudscha.  The northern part of Dobrudscha was a part of Romanian rule at the time, and the government welcomed immigrants.

The "country at time of founding" was tricky in this area and depended a lot on the year that Germans settled a village or joined an existing one.  Dobrudscha was a part of the Ottoman Empire between 1840 and 1878, and thus they were subjects of Turkey.  After 1878 and the Treaty San Stefano, all of Dobrudscha was given to Russia, but Russia ceded the northern part to Romania in exchange for the southern part of Bessarabia.  The northern colonies were subjects of Romania and the southern subjects of Russia.  After the Second Balken war in 1913, both northern and southern Dobrudscha were both a part of Romainia.  Romania would also get Bessarabia back in 1918... but that's another map!

The following maps have been updated: 
All of the maps associated with this site along with their descriptions can be found on the Maps page and a list of sources used on the Sources page.

Dobrudscha Sources:




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    On This Day, 14 June 1766

    Catholic Mother colony Rohleder was founded on 14 June 1766 by LeRoy and Picet, a co-operative company commissioned by Catherine the Great to recruit and settle Germans in Russia. The village included a cooperative store, an agriculture kolkhoz founded with loans, a machinery kolkhoz and a school with grades 1 through 4.

    Today, the remains of the colony are within the town limits of Raskatovo, Saratov, Russia.

    Location of Rohleder. 


    For more information, visit the following sites: 
    Center for Volga German Studies - Rohleder
    LeRoy and Pictet
    Volga German Institute - Rohleder
    Volga Germans Germans from Russia - Rohleder



    2017 marks the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Mother colonies along the Volga River. There are many events throughout the year to commemorate the anniversary, and the Germans from 
    Russia Settlement Locations project joins in the celebration of this rich Volga German heritage.  

    The German immigrants that came to the Volga region were among first colonists to take up Catherine the Great on her manifesto. They came from Hesse, the Rhineland, the Palatinate and Württemberg.  They are also among the most well researched and documented groups of German colonists in Russia. Thus far, the Volga Mother colonies settled between 1764 and 1767 are the only colonies that have precise dates they were settled.  

    For more historical and current events related to Germans from Russia, see our calendar page or link to our public Google calendar.





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    13 June 2017

    Map Refresh: Galizien

    The map of the Galizien colonies have been updated including some adjustments in location and/or current names for the following colonies: Alt-Bielitz, Bielitz, Hundstal, Kunzendorf, Krzywulanka, Kranzberg, Mariahilf, Marienhof, Mikulsdorf, Münchenthal, Muzylowice Narodowe, Neu-Babylon, Olszanka, Ostrowiec, Preppendorf.

    While looking through the Gemeindelexikon der im Reichsrate vertretenen Königreiche und Länder (Gazetteer of the Crown Lands and Territories Represented in the Imperial Council), we found that a two villages on the historical map by Rudolf Unterschütz of Galizien were technically a part of Schlesien (Silesia) – Alt-Bielitz, Bielitz. The area reflects this now, and a reference to the pages online are included in the sources for each village.

    The following maps have been updated:

    All of the maps associated with this site along with their descriptions can be found on the Maps page and a list of sources used on the Sources page.

    Galizien Sources:

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    On This Day, 13 June 1765

    Husaren, a Volga Catholic Mother colony, was founded on this day, 13 June 1765, next to the Ilovlya River across from the colony of Volmer (founded 18 July 1766).  It began with 14 households with a total of 39 colonists, 19 male and 20 female.  Within 20 years, it would grow to 222 households with a total of 1,510 colonists, 772 male and 738 female.


    Location of Husaren, now known as Elshanka, Saratov, Russia. 



    For more information, visit the following sites: 
    Center for Volga German Studies - Husaren
    Wolgadeutsche (History of the Volga Germans) - Husaren
    Volga German Institute - Husaren


    2017 marks the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Mother colonies along the Volga River. There are many events throughout the year to commemorate the anniversary, and the Germans from 
    Russia Settlement Locations project joins in the celebration of this rich Volga German heritage.  

    The German immigrants that came to the Volga region were among first colonists to take up Catherine the Great on her manifesto. They came from Hesse, the Rhineland, the Palatinate and Württemberg.  They are also among the most well researched and documented groups of German colonists in Russia. Thus far, the Volga Mother colonies settled between 1764 and 1767 are the only colonies that have precise dates they were settled.  

    For more historical and current events related to Germans from Russia, see our calendar page or link to our public Google calendar.







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    12 June 2017

    12 June 1879 - Rosenfeld, North Caucasus

    The village of Rosenfeld in the North Caucasus was founded in 1872.  Seven years later on this day, 12 June 1879, they petitioned the Russian regional administrator of the area to create their own local administration run by members of the colony complete with German translations of all the actions and decrees of their self governance.

    You may recall that by this time, beginning in 1871,Tsar Alexander II had revoked all the privileges given to German colonists by Catherine the Great and Alexander I, including self-governance and tax privileges. Russian nationalism was on the rise and the German colonies were beginning to be subject to "Russification."

    Below is the transcription and original document courtesy of the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia.  Note that Rosina Vetter was among "owners and residents" who signed the document, the only woman listed.

    There is no indication if the petition was accepted or denied, but still... they tried.


    [The Colony Rosenfeld in the North Caucasus] 
    Petition 
    In the year 1879 on 12 June, we, the undersigned settlers, owners and residents of our own diligently earned piece of land in the Kuban River area of the Caucasian region, a colony that bears the name, Rosenfeld, which was created and developed by us personally, so hearby request that our petition of 12 June be acknowledged by His Honor, the Regional Administrator of the Caucasus and that we be given authority to select from our midst Christian Braunberger, Johannes Walter and Christian Mauch, men of standing in our community, to create a local administration which will include the position of mayor, and moreover we respectfully request that German translations of all actions and decrees be prepared so that everyone may fully understand the import of the same to enable the proper carrying out of our community affairs to which we the undersigned herewith pledge ourselves. 
    Matias Walter, Johannes Schaefer, Gottlieb Meyer, Andreas Mahler, Philip Litz, Friedrich Meyer, Gottlieb Schaefer, Johannes Walter, Jakob Heihn, Johann Karlin, Friedrich Mayer, Johann Walter, Christian Braunberger, Christian Mauch, Johann Kramer, Ludwig Doehring, Daniel Brunsch, Gottlieb Kuhn, Martin Littau, Wilhelm Braunsch, Michael Kuhn, Wilhelm Muench, Wilhelm Banik, Friedrich Bietz, Jakob Bietz, Gottlieb Schelske, Christian Schelske, Rosina Vetter, August Savans, Gottlieb Mueller, Karl Herrmann, Konrad Herrmann, Georg Weidner.

    Russian/German copy acquired in the Archives at Odessa, Ukraine

    August 18, 1993 by Arthur E. Flegel. Translated September 24, 1993










    Location of Rosenfeld, North Caucasus.
    Currently known as Sheremetyevskoye, Krasnodar Krai, Russia.

    _________________________________________________________________________________




    For more historical and current events related to Germans from Russia, see our calendar page or link to our public Google calendar.


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    On This Day, 12 June 1767

    Unterwalden, also commonly known as Meinhard, was founded as a Lutheran colony on 12 June 1767 by Baron Ferdinand de Canneau de Beauregard, a settlement agent hired by Catherine the Great.  It was located between the colonies of Susannental (founded later that year on 3 August 1767) and Remmier (Luzern, founded later this month on 20 June 1767).

    While sources generally agree that this was the date of the founding of this colony, there are some on the lexicon of Wolgadeutsche (History of the Volga Germans) for Unterwalden that say it was settled, or at least occupied by German colonists, earlier than it's official founding date.  Some stat that it was as early as 1764-1766, and one stated that it was settled in 1767, but not founded until 1768.  There aren't any household or population numbers available until 1769, so a later founding year may actually be correct.

    After 1915, Unterwalden was called Podlesnoe (Podlesnoye), which is what it still goes by today.


    Location of the village of Unterwalden. 

































    For more information, visit the following sites: 
    Center for Volga German Studies - Meinhard (Unterwalden)
    Geschichte der Russlanddeutschen (History of Russian Germans) - Baron Canneau de Beauregard
    Wolgadeutsche (History of the Volga Germans) - Unterwalden
    Volga German Institute - Meinhard (Unterwalden)


    2017 marks the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Mother colonies along the Volga River. There are many events throughout the year to commemorate the anniversary, and the Germans from 
    Russia Settlement Locations project joins in the celebration of this rich Volga German heritage.  

    The German immigrants that came to the Volga region were among first colonists to take up Catherine the Great on her manifesto. They came from Hesse, the Rhineland, the Palatinate and Württemberg.  They are also among the most well researched and documented groups of German colonists in Russia. Thus far, the Volga Mother colonies settled between 1764 and 1767 are the only colonies that have precise dates they were settled.  

    For more historical and current events related to Germans from Russia, see our calendar page or link to our public Google calendar.






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    10 June 2017

    On This Day, 10 June 1766

    The Roman Catholic colony of Graf was founded on this day, 10 June 1766 on the "Wiesenseite" (the meadow side) of the Volga River.

    It was founded with the assistance of the LeRoy and Picet, a co-operative company commissioned by Catherine the Great to recruit and settle Germans in Russia.  By the end of the first year, there were 48 households in Graf.

    The colony no longer exists.


    Plat map of Graf, circa 1930. 
    Map courtesy of Volga German Germans from Russia website.
    Location of defunct village of Graf.
    The last known name for it was Krutoyarovka.



    For more information, visit the following sites: 
    Center for Volga German Studies - Graf
    LeRoy and Pictet
    Volga Germans Germans from Russia - Graf
    Volga German Institute - Graf



    2017 marks the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Mother colonies along the Volga River. There are many events throughout the year to commemorate the anniversary, and the Germans from 
    Russia Settlement Locations project joins in the celebration of this rich Volga German heritage.  

    The German immigrants that came to the Volga region were among first colonists to take up Catherine the Great on her manifesto. They came from Hesse, the Rhineland, the Palatinate and Württemberg.  They are also among the most well researched and documented groups of German colonists in Russia. Thus far, the Volga Mother colonies settled between 1764 and 1767 are the only colonies that have precise dates they were settled.  

    For more historical and current events related to Germans from Russia, see our calendar page or link to our public Google calendar.





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    07 June 2017

    On This Day, 7 June 1767

    It was a busy day in the Volga on this day, 7 June 1767, where five Lutheran Volga Mother colonies were founded: Boisroux, Kaneau, Nieder-Monjou, Orlovskaya and Paulskaya.


    All were founded by Baron Ferdinand de Canneau de Beauregard, who had agreement with Catherine the Great to act as her director of settlement.  The terms of the agreement included a promise that he would he would recruit and settle 4,000 colonists in return for a loan to cover transportation costs along with three percent of the settlement area for his own business. In addition, he was to receive an interest-free loan of 350 rubles for the settlement of each 100 colonist families.  He was only able to recruit 2,000 colonists, after which Catherine, disappointed in his performance, terminated his contract.  Several villages were named for Canneau de Beauregard and his family: Kaneau, and Beauregard were named after himself; Katharinenstadt, Ernestinendorf (Beckersdorf) and Philippsfeld after his children; Susannental named for his wife; Nieder-Monjou after his assistant.

    In total, 1,407 colonists were settled into 349 households in these five colonies in 1767.



    Village
    Households
    Population in 1767
    TotalMaleFemale
    Boisroux97*281152129
    Kaneau87283140143
    Nieder-Monjou88279143136
    Orlovskaya87284151133
    Paulskaya87280144136
    Total3491407730677
    *An additional 81 households were included in the 1767 census of Boisroux who were destined to be settled in other colonies the following year.


    Boisroux, currently known as Borodaevka, Saratov, Russia 

    Kaneau, currently known as Pervaya Andreyevka, Saratov, Russia.
    Named after Baron Ferdinand de Canneau de Beauregard.

    Nieder-Monjou, currently known as Bobrovka, Saratov, Russia.
    Named for Otto Friedrich von Monjou, Canneau de Beauregard's assistant.   

    Orlovskaya, currently known as Orlovskoye, Saratov, Russia

    Paulskaya, currently known as Pavlovka, Saratov, Russia. 
    Named for Catherine the Great's son and heir apparent, Paul.























    For more information about these villages, visit the following sites: 
    Geschichte der Russlanddeutschen (History of Russian Germans)Baron Canneau de Beauregard
    Center for Volga German Studies - Boisroux, Kaneau, Nieder-Monjou, Orlovskaya, Paulskaya
    Volga German Institute - Boisroux, Kaneau, Nieder-Monjou, Orlovskaya, Paulskaya




    2017 marks the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Mother colonies along the Volga River. There are many events throughout the year to commemorate the anniversary, and the Germans from 
    Russia Settlement Locations project joins in the celebration of this rich Volga German heritage.  

    The German immigrants that came to the Volga region were among first colonists to take up Catherine the Great on her manifesto. They came from Hesse, the Rhineland, the Palatinate and Württemberg.  They are also among the most well researched and documented groups of German colonists in Russia. Thus far, the Volga Mother colonies settled between 1764 and 1767 are the only colonies that have precise dates they were settled.  

    For more historical and current events related to Germans from Russia, see our calendar page or link to our public Google calendar.




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